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14 Sep 2009

Man Investments & Dexion Launch Man AHL Diversity

Alternative asset manager, Man Investments, and UK hedge fund advisory and marketing firm, Dexion Capital Group, announced the launch of a new UCITS III trend following product, Man AHL Diversity.

“Historically, the performance of trend following managers has tended to be uncorrelated to traditional stock and bond markets." Tim Wong, Chief Executive Officer of AHL, said, "We saw that with AHL’s highly impressive performance last year when its best performing fund delivered 33% at the same time as some equity markets fell 40%.”

Investors will be able to access the sterling denominated product with a minimum initial investment of £100 from the product’s launch in October 2009.

Founded in 1987, AHL manages $20.4 billion (as at 31 March 2009) and has delivered a strong track record of performance. Based on past data and adjusted for structure, fees and costs, Man AHL Diversity would have delivered annualised returns of over 14% during the past 14 years. AHL managed funds have produced a positive return in every calendar year since inception.

AHL’s track record has been greatly reinforced through Man’s funding of the Oxford-Man Institute (OMI) and the creation of AHL Oxford, the compny says.

The Oxford University academics of the OMI and AHL’s researchers in AHL Oxford share purpose designed premises, where AHL’s researchers have already developed several valuable commercial applications. Now in its second year, this arrangement has created a stimulating environment that fosters day-to-day interactions between AHL and the university's academics and students, and has provided AHL with exposure to leading academic thinking from a worldwide network of experts and wide spectrum of disciplines.

Trend followers – often known as managed futures managers – seek to exploit persistent trends and other market inefficiencies in a systematic way using highly liquid futures markets. Their funds are designed to perform whether prices trend up or down with the result that returns tend to be uncorrelated with traditional stock or bond markets.

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